Tag Archives: media

Hard Out Here: For a Bitch, From a Bitch

14 Nov

I want to start of by saying I love Lily Allen.

The Fear-great song. 22- Amazing. Smile- also one of my favorites.  The first time I heard her new song/watched the video for “Hard Out Here” I was confused – I actually almost even got a little mad a Lily. But then I realized- Holy shit, she is a fucking genius.

Verse 2 says it all:

If you’re not a size six
Then you’re not good-looking
Well, you better be rich
Or be real good at cooking
You should probably lose some weight
‘Cause we can’t see your bones
You should probably fix your face
Or you’ll end up on your own
Don’t you want to have somebody who objectifies you?
Have you thought about your butt, who’s gonna tear it in two?
We’ve never had it so good, uh huh
We’re out of the woods
And if you can’t detect the sarcasm
You’ve misunderstood

The lyrics are good…the verses, really really speak the unfortunate truth of what it is to be a woman (especially being a woman in the entertainment industry). 

People are questioning her reasons behind hiring the dancers she did, and this was her response:

“The video is meant to be a lighthearted satirical video that deals with objectification of women within modern pop culture,” she wrote. “It has nothing to do with race, at all.” She said that she tried for weeks to get her own twerk moves down but couldn’t get it right, and so hired the best dancers for the job; and that the reason she was more clothed was insecurity about her figure (reminding fans that she did have two children recently).

“I’m not going to apologise because I think that would imply that I’m guilty of something, but I promise you this, in no way do I feel superior to anyone, except paedophiles, rapists murderers etc., and I would not only be surprised but deeply saddened if I thought anyone came away from that video feeling taken advantage of, or compromised in any way,” she wrote, before concluding with an invitation to “Ask the ladies yourselves @shalaeuroasia @monique_Lawz @ceodancers @TempleArtist @SelizaShowtime @melycrisp.” – LA Times

In conclusion, from one bitch to another, way to go Lily. It is indeed Hard Out Here.

PS: I hope I look that good after I have kids.

 

Please Don’t Tell Me I’m Beautiful – How I Feel

8 Sep

“I understand that we live in a culture where “beautiful” and “female” have a long and complicated relationship. I know that women want to comfort each other through the hurt of living in an air-brushed, surgically-enhanced, Top Model, Cover Girl society. I also know that the word “beautiful” can be used to describe the inner person and not just their looks. But I have to wonder if we’re really doing ourselves more harm than good when we insist on giving beauty such a dominant space in the sphere of women’s lives and conversations. Even in “acceptance” movements, beauty is a central theme.

Why is not okay to be un-beautiful? Why is it so painful to admit a lack of objective beauty where it may not, in any objective sense, exist?”  “

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“Why does the matriarchy feel so drawn to steeping itself in assurances of beauty? Not that I’m using men as a role model, but they don’t tip-toe around the subject of physical attractiveness, stopping to console each other that their beer bellies, balding heads and scarred faces are really, truly beautiful. They don’t insist on denying their realities or the realities of other men by promoting the concept that all men are “handsome” in their own way. Instead, they have come to take for granted a patriarchy where “handsome” may be a gift, but unattractiveness is really not that big of a deal.

I wish we’d get there. I suspect that when women quit focusing so much on beauty, theirs and other women’s — whether physical or in the broad sense of personality — that we will be able to change our real-world consequences. We will be more truthful, more realistic, more effective and therefore more tangibly helpful to one another.”

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“We’re never going to make it okay to not be physically beautiful if we don’t get off this beauty kick we’ve been on for so long. We’re not going to change our futures and those of other women as long as “beautiful” remains a priority. We’re not going to change the culture that places such an inordinately high premium on female attractiveness as long we keep promoting beauty myths through the lies we tell ourselves and each other.” 

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These are all quotes from Jane Devin’s Please Don’t Tell Me I’m Beautiful

Usually I am the first one to say that every woman is beautiful, even if society says they aren’t. Devin however, gives a different take on the situation. I don’t think she’s wrong at all. Maybe the American culture isn’t wrong, maybe it’s just us women who take it too seriously. 

It takes a strong woman to know what she is and what she isn’t. It takes a strong woman to know what she can and cannot do (because most of us think that we’re Superwoman). And lastly, it takes a strong woman to know what she deserves and when she deserves better whether it be in love, career, and just life in general. 

Maybe, we should start caring less about what our “culture” is, and start taking ourselves more seriously.

Thoughts? 

Curves all over the World (American culture sucks sometimes)

18 Jul

This isn’t the first, and will probably not be the last time I mention how astounded I am at how obsessed people are with their own bodies. Recently I’ve started thinking about if this is just an American thing or if it’s just a girl thing to want to be skinny. Interestingly enough, Americans are the only ones that really care about this stuff. 

Here’s what I found on 4healthylife.com,


Waist to Hip Ratio

An important factor that measures the level of woman’s attractive is waist-to-hip ratio. Waist-to-hip ratio is calculated by dividing the circumference of woman’s waist by circumference of her hip. However, the preferred ratio is different in different countries. Like in Western countries, women with waist-to-hip ratio of 0.7 are considered most attractive. In Asian countries the ratio is 0.6 while in Latin American and African countries the ratio of 0.8 is found most appealing. This shows that hourglass figure is most liked by men.

…Wait, there’s more from an amazing post on lemondrop.com
South Africa 
For the women of South Africa, there was a brief moment in the post-Apartheid 1990s where the emulation of Western culture meant a distinct rise in eating disorders. But since then, a radically different, pro-body-image movement has arisen, due in no small part to the fact that the spread of AIDS has caused thinness to be associated with illness.”When you lose a lot of weight there, people immediately start asking if you’re sick,” Savacool said. An interesting consequence of this is that Levi’s have begun selling a special cut of jeans to flatter curvier South Africans; the style is not yet available in the United States, but does well overseas.

Fiji
The Fijian nation’s leaders have striven to connect the once-isolated island with the rest of the world, but the influx of American and Australian television and films has begun spreading an unhealthy body image in a culture that has always embraced eating — to the point where every visitor to a home is immediately greeted with a gift of food. There are pro-curves movements afoot, but the culture has been compromised by Western society.

Jamaica
For young women of this Caribbean nation, it’s socially essential to have a little junk in the trunk, as the dance styles most popular in the country rely heavily on being able to shake what you got. As a result, curves are most definitely embraced, but naturally thin women are occasionally driven to consuming high-fat “chicken pills” in an effort to gain weight.

Afghanistan
Savacool is quick to point out that the body-concealing burqa used to be a personal choice for women, but is now a matter of national law. Beyond that, curves are definitely embraced. Additionally, a woman’s face and hair are given equal emphasis when judging her beauty. The longer a woman’s hair, the better, it’s believed, but it is often true that Afghani beauty is more defined by a pretty face that a toned body.

I’m not going to say that these countries don’t have their own body image issues, no one is perfect. But at least they’re all promoting curves as something beautiful and healthy, not like Americans who see them as wrong or disgusting. 

Luckily, as this “trying so hard to diet and exercise to be thin, not healthy” trend is progressing, there are more and more women becoming aware of body image issues amongst not only grown women, but ESPECIALLY in teenage girls. I just came across an article in which they ask their readers to send in a picture of a body part they’re dying to change on Huffington Post, LOVING IT. They’re asking for it to be completely unedited and it’s working! Click here to read the whole piece. 
And I will leave you with this, I have gained ten pounds, (maybe twelve) over the past year. AND I F***ING LOVE IT. 

Miss Representation

14 May

I came across the trailer for this documentary last week and I’ve decided that if I can get enough people in favor, I would like to host a screening of this in New York City. It was in the Sundance Film Festival in 2011 and I’d really want to be a part of spreading the word! Just by watching the trailer I can see that the director of this film, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, definitely has been thinking about a lot of the ideas I have been posting on this blog. Hopefully I can find some way to collaborate with them, but for now, spread the trailer and let me know if you’d be interested in seeing this!